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National Roofing Contractors Association Urges Roof Inspection, Repair Following Tornadoes and Windstorms to Occur Quickly, with Caution


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Charlotte Norgaard
Date: Nov. 18, 2013 (847)493-7548
  cnorgaard@nrca.net

National Roofing Contractors Association Urges Roof Inspection, Repair Following Tornadoes and Windstorms to Occur Quickly, with Caution


Rosemont, Ill. — In the aftermath of the devastating tornadoes and windstorms that struck Midwestern states on Sunday, the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) is reminding affected homeowners to use extreme caution throughout the inspection and restoration process of their roofing systems.

Unlike interior or external damage that can be seen at eye level, inspecting rooftop damage involves climbing a ladder on a potentially unsound, storm-damaged structure. NRCA urges homeowners to proceed with caution and never attempt an inspection alone.

Although roofs are designed to resist wind loads that are common for their geographical location, no roof system can withstand the most extreme winds, and damage typically occurs incrementally. Damage starts small and grows through repeated wind cycles, usually over time.

NRCA recommends that inspection and repair of damaged roofs occur as quickly as possible to prevent rain damage, and subsequent winds from causing further damage.

When inspecting a roof, look for items such as shards of glass and tree branches that can severely damage a roof system. Inspecting a roof after a tornado or strong windstorm should not only include checking to be sure areas are tight and attachments are still secure, but also should also include what might have blown onto or across a roof.

Windblown debris tends to accumulate and clog drains and downspouts, which can cause future drainage problems if not removed.

NRCA stresses that homeowners should only attempt to climb a ladder to assess damage during daylight hours, and should wear sturdy shoes or boots, a long sleeve shirt and work gloves when doing so.

Following a natural disaster, NRCA also warns that it is common for unprofessional contractors to take advantage of unsuspecting and distressed homeowners. If it is necessary to hire a professional roofing contractor, homeowners should keep a healthy skepticism about the lowest bid and take time to evaluate potential contractors before any reroofing begins. For a list of criteria to consider when hiring a professional roofing contractor, visit http://staticcontent.nrca.net/pdf/0113_tornado.pdf.

For additional information on inspecting and repairing wind damaged roof systems or to locate a roofing contractor, visit http://www.nrca.net/roofing/Consumer-natural-disaster-information-877

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NRCA is one of the construction industry's most respected trade associations and the voice and leading authority in the roofing industry for information, education, technology and advocacy. It represents all segments of the roofing industry, including contractors; manufacturers; distributors; architects; consultants; engineers; building owners; and city, state and government agencies. NRCA's mission is to inform and assist the roofing industry, act as its principal advocate and help members in serving their customers. NRCA continually strives to enhance every aspect of the roofing industry. For information about NRCA and its services and offerings, visit www.nrca.net.





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